1. midsemester:

Vivian Leigh

    midsemester:

    Vivian Leigh

    (Source: dailyshakespeare)

  2. Come visit our table at the GWU Org Fair in Kogan Plaza! We’re in the walkway next to Gelman!

    Come visit our table at the GWU Org Fair in Kogan Plaza! We’re in the walkway next to Gelman!

  3. Join us!

    General Body Meeting on August 27th at 7!

    Smackdown Auditions on August 27th and 28th at 7:30 and 7, respectively!

    Tempest Auditions on August 31st and September 1st at 2 and 6, respectively!

  4. The Tempest Auditions | Facebook

    Sunday, August 31st from 2pm-5pm and Monday, September 1st from 6pm-9pm in the Ivory Tower Common Room! Come one and all!

  5. William Shakespeare, the Bard of Avon

William Shakespeare (Introduced 1987, with a new strain in 2000)
Without doubt, the best crimson English Rose to date. It is a truly superb variety with exquisite blooms of the richest velvety crimson, gradually changing to an equally rich purple. Deeply cupped at first, the flower soon opens out to a shallow quartered cup. The growth is neat and upright; each stem bearing a number of flowers. This rose has the strong, warm Old Rose fragrance that we expect, but do not always find, in deep red roses. It has excellent disease resistance. We [the breeders of the rose] have planted a large bed of William Shakespeare and a mixed border of English and Old Roses at Shakespeare’s birthplace in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Shakespeare Roses [x]

    William Shakespeare, the Bard of Avon

    William Shakespeare (Introduced 1987, with a new strain in 2000)

    Without doubt, the best crimson English Rose to date. It is a truly superb variety with exquisite blooms of the richest velvety crimson, gradually changing to an equally rich purple. Deeply cupped at first, the flower soon opens out to a shallow quartered cup. The growth is neat and upright; each stem bearing a number of flowers. 

    This rose has the strong, warm Old Rose fragrance that we expect, but do not always find, in deep red roses. It has excellent disease resistance. 

    We [the breeders of the rose] have planted a large bed of William Shakespeare and a mixed border of English and Old Roses at Shakespeare’s birthplace in Stratford-upon-Avon.

    Shakespeare Roses [x]

  6. Noble Antony from Antony & Cleopatra and Julius Caesar

Noble Antony (Introduced 1995)
The deep magenta-crimson blooms are full petalled; the outer petals turning back creating a perfectly formalised, deeply domed shape. The blooms are set against dark green foliage producing, overall, a very attractive dark effect. ‘Noble Antony’ is a particularly good rose for cutting for arrangements in the home, where its beauty can be fully appreciated. It has a delightful, rich Old Rose scent and won the prize for fragrance at the Glasgow trials. This reliable shrub, with its compact growth, is a good choice for smaller gardens or for bedding. Placed at the front of the border, its bold colouring will create contrast amongst plants of softer shades

Shakespeare Roses [x]

    Noble Antony from Antony & Cleopatra and Julius Caesar

    Noble Antony (Introduced 1995)

    The deep magenta-crimson blooms are full petalled; the outer petals turning back creating a perfectly formalised, deeply domed shape. The blooms are set against dark green foliage producing, overall, a very attractive dark effect. ‘Noble Antony’ is a particularly good rose for cutting for arrangements in the home, where its beauty can be fully appreciated. It has a delightful, rich Old Rose scent and won the prize for fragrance at the Glasgow trials. This reliable shrub, with its compact growth, is a good choice for smaller gardens or for bedding. Placed at the front of the border, its bold colouring will create contrast amongst plants of softer shades

    Shakespeare Roses [x]

  7. Glamis Castle, setting of Macbeth

Glamis Castle (Introduced 1997)
This outstanding rose has white flowers and dainty, bushy growth with light, twiggy branches. The flowers are deeply cupped with rather informally arranged petals; there is a strong myrrh fragrance. Being short, it is an ideal plant for small gardens for the front of borders, or for use as a bedding rose. It flowers with all the freedom and continuity of the Floribunda, while retaining the charm of an Old Rose, and its bloom produce a wonderful, airy effect in the mass. 

Shakespeare Roses [x]

    Glamis Castle, setting of Macbeth

    Glamis Castle (Introduced 1997)

    This outstanding rose has white flowers and dainty, bushy growth with light, twiggy branches. The flowers are deeply cupped with rather informally arranged petals; there is a strong myrrh fragrance. Being short, it is an ideal plant for small gardens for the front of borders, or for use as a bedding rose. It flowers with all the freedom and continuity of the Floribunda, while retaining the charm of an Old Rose, and its bloom produce a wonderful, airy effect in the mass. 

    Shakespeare Roses [x]

  8. Hero from Much Ado About Nothing

Hero (Introduced 1982)
The exceptional feature of this rose is the pure, clear pink of its deep globe-shaped flowers. Later in the season the flowers are usually shallowly cupped. The blooms are widely spaced and held in sprays; they have a strong myrrh fragrance. The growth is tall and, by the standards of the later English Roses, perhaps rather too open, with long, smooth stems, occasional thorns, and sparse foliage. This is a rose that needs to be grown in a group of three or more, where it will combine to make one good shrub.

Shakespeare Roses [x]

    Hero from Much Ado About Nothing

    Hero (Introduced 1982)

    The exceptional feature of this rose is the pure, clear pink of its deep globe-shaped flowers. Later in the season the flowers are usually shallowly cupped. The blooms are widely spaced and held in sprays; they have a strong myrrh fragrance. The growth is tall and, by the standards of the later English Roses, perhaps rather too open, with long, smooth stems, occasional thorns, and sparse foliage. This is a rose that needs to be grown in a group of three or more, where it will combine to make one good shrub.

    Shakespeare Roses [x]

  9. Perdita and Gentle Hermione from The Winter’s Tale

    Perdita (Introduced 1983)

    A member of the Heritage group, Perdita is a little shorter than the rose ‘Heritage’ itself. It has a darker foliage, and forms a neat bush of medium size. The flowers begin as small, almost Hybrid Tea buds, opening at first cupped and later as a neat rosette. The bud is soft pink at the center with almost white outer petals. Later this turns to a blush-pink, flushed with yellow at the base of the petals. The fragrance is spicy: Perdita was award the Henry Edland Medal for fragrance is 1984.

    Gentle Hermione (Introduced 2005)

    This variety bears some of the most perfectly formed flowers of true Old Rose character. 
    Starting as attractive, nicely rounded buds, the flowers gradually open to shallow cups with all their petals perfectly arranged. Their colour is pure pink with soft blush on the outside and a lovely pure pink at the centre; the whole effect being totally charming. 
    ‘Gentle Hermione’ will form an attractive, rounded shrub of medium height with slightly arching stems. It has excellent health and the petals are particularly resistant to rain. It has a strong, warm, classic Old Rose scent with a hint of myrrh. 

    Shakespeare Roses [x]

  10. Ophelia from Hamlet

Ophelia (Introduced 1912)
This rose and its three sports: Mme Butterfly, Lady Sylvia and Westfield Star, which are similar in every way except for colour, have been some of the best loved roses throughout this century. Ophelia produces exquisitely formed buds of delicate blush pink and it has a rich fragrance. It forms a strong plant which can be grown as a slender specimen shrub if desired. 

Shakespeare Roses [x]

    Ophelia from Hamlet

    Ophelia (Introduced 1912)

    This rose and its three sports: Mme Butterfly, Lady Sylvia and Westfield Star, which are similar in every way except for colour, have been some of the best loved roses throughout this century. Ophelia produces exquisitely formed buds of delicate blush pink and it has a rich fragrance. It forms a strong plant which can be grown as a slender specimen shrub if desired. 

    Shakespeare Roses [x]

  11. Heavenly Rosalind from As You Like It [or Love’s Labours Lost]

Rosalind (Introduced 1995)
Similar to the ‘Alexandra Rose’, bearing masses of medium to smaller-sized single flowers continually on a fairly large and well-formed, twiggy shrub. The difference is that this rose has soft pink flowers that deepen towards the edges of the petals, giving a dainty, Wild Rose effect. It is hardy and bushy, and flowers with remarkable continuity. In every way, an excellent shrub for a border, or to stand alone singly or in a small group. 

Shakespeare Roses [x]

    Heavenly Rosalind from As You Like It [or Love’s Labours Lost]

    Rosalind (Introduced 1995)

    Similar to the ‘Alexandra Rose’, bearing masses of medium to smaller-sized single flowers continually on a fairly large and well-formed, twiggy shrub. The difference is that this rose has soft pink flowers that deepen towards the edges of the petals, giving a dainty, Wild Rose effect. It is hardy and bushy, and flowers with remarkable continuity. In every way, an excellent shrub for a border, or to stand alone singly or in a small group. 

    Shakespeare Roses [x]

  12. Oberon and Titania from A Midsummer Night’s Dream

    Lordly Oberon (Introduced 1982, Discontinued 1989)

    A deep pink rose that fades as it ages.

    Proud Titania (Introduced 1980, Discontinued 1989)

    A white rose, also known as ‘Fragrant Old White’

    Both these roses failed to flourish in the country of their creation, England, and were deemed by their creator as ‘inferior’ roses that are only suitable for collectors and dedicated rose enthusiasts.

    Shakespeare Roses [x]

  13. Tamora, Queen of the Goths, from Titus Andronicus 

Tamora (Introduced 1983)
One of our earlier varieties, and a source of many of our best yellow roses. It is closely related to the old Gloire de Dijon and it has inherited both its lovely glistening apricot color and its delicious fragrance. It forms a short bush, suitable either for rose bed or border, and is remarkably disease-resistant. The flowers are at first attractively rounded, opening to a shallow cup. It has a remarkable and unusual fragrance with aspects of lilac and mimosa. 

Shakespeare Roses [x]

    Tamora, Queen of the Goths, from Titus Andronicus 

    Tamora (Introduced 1983)

    One of our earlier varieties, and a source of many of our best yellow roses. It is closely related to the old Gloire de Dijon and it has inherited both its lovely glistening apricot color and its delicious fragrance. It forms a short bush, suitable either for rose bed or border, and is remarkably disease-resistant. The flowers are at first attractively rounded, opening to a shallow cup. It has a remarkable and unusual fragrance with aspects of lilac and mimosa. 

    Shakespeare Roses [x]

  14. Jaquenetta from Love’s Labours Lost

Jaquenetta (Introduced 1983)
Large single flowers, in great masses, on a strong free-growing shrub. These are blush pink, tending towards apricot and held sometimes singly and sometimes in small bunches. A massive show of bloom over a long period.

Shakespeare Roses [x]

    Jaquenetta from Love’s Labours Lost

    Jaquenetta (Introduced 1983)

    Large single flowers, in great masses, on a strong free-growing shrub. 
    These are blush pink, tending towards apricot and held sometimes singly and sometimes in small bunches. A massive show of bloom over a long period.

    Shakespeare Roses [x]

  15. Othello (title character)

Othello (Introduced 1986)
Massive cup-shaped flowers, filled with petals of a dusky crimson, mingled with a variety of light red shades. Its growth is tall and vigorous, with dark matte foliage and many thorns. A striking and unusual rose that is very hardy with a strong, rich Old Rose fragrance. It can be quite vigorous in warmer areas and so should be summer pruned if you want it to grow as a shrub. 

Shakespeare Roses [x]

    Othello (title character)

    Othello (Introduced 1986)

    Massive cup-shaped flowers, filled with petals of a dusky crimson, mingled with a variety of light red shades. 
    Its growth is tall and vigorous, with dark matte foliage and many thorns. 
    A striking and unusual rose that is very hardy with a strong, rich Old Rose fragrance. It can be quite vigorous in warmer areas and so should be summer pruned if you want it to grow as a shrub. 

    Shakespeare Roses [x]